Ambient Air Pollution and the Risk of Childhood-onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease | FEBRUARY 12 | 2019

9am-10am pacific | 12 noon – 1pm eastern

 

 The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has risen drastically in industrialized nations, such as Canada, over the last half of the 20th century. Although the incidence rate in adults with IBD has plateaued in Canada, the incidence of IBD among Canadian children is continuing to rise. Environmental risk factors, such as air pollution may be involved in IBD development, but epidemiological studies are inconclusive.

This presentation will summarize the results from a study investigating the effects of ambient air pollution on the risk of developing pediatric-onset IBD using Ontario administrative health data. In-utero and childhood residential exposures to nitrogen dioxide (NO2), fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone (O3) were evaluated in terms of their potential associations with IBD diagnosed before the age of 18. Other environmental factors, such as residential exposure to greenness as well as several maternal and individual-level factors were also considered as potential confounders and effect modifiers of these associations.

Michael Elten is currently completing a Master’s degree in Epidemiology in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health at the University of Ottawa. His research focuses on evaluating the effects of air pollution on health, with an emphasis on maternal and early-life exposures.

 

 

 

 

 

Interactive Mapping of Environmental Health Assessments | MARCH 19 | 2019

9am-10am pacific | 12 noon – 1pm eastern

Non communicable diseases including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among populations in high income countries. The rapid increase of overweight and obesity among Canadians and its associated consequences, including hypertension and diabetes is a major public health problem, and threaten to halt the declines in cardiovascular disease deaths Canada has experienced in the past 30 years.

Knowledge gaps exist regarding the impact of the built environment in relation to individual risk factor development, and the variation of these built environments across Canada by region and rurality. In order to address these gaps in our knowledge, we convened the Canadian Alliance of Healthy Hearts and Minds – a prospective cohort of men and women recruited from existing cohorts in Canada and through recruitment of a new First Nations cohort study.

As part of the knowledge translation plan of the Canadian Alliance for Healthy Hearts and Minds project, we developed and released an on-line, interactive map of 2,074 communities across Canada that conveys the information from our community contextual health audits. In this presentation, I will describe the development of the map, and describe how to access and use the tools embedded in the map.

Russell de Souza is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact at McMaster University.  He is a registered dietitian, and his research focuses on dietary patterns, health, and how the food environment shapes food choice and risk of cardiovascular disease.

URBAN FORM METRICS FROM HIGH RESOLUTION SATELLITE AND STREET-LEVEL IMAGERY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We are getting ready to start some intensive work on developing urban form metrics from high resolution satellite and street-level imagery. We will be hosting two virtual meetings to develop a comprehensive list of metrics and applications that are high on the priority list for CANUE members. Your feedback will help us develop a work program for CANUE staff in the coming months.

We will be hosting the same meeting on Dec 4th  (9am to 10:30 am pacific) and Dec 6th (12 noon to 1:30pm pacific).

REGISTER HERE  for your preferred date.

If you are unable to attend on either date, please email info@canue.ca with the following message: “please add me to the working group for machine learning and high resolution imagery”. You can provide feedback prior to the meetings, and we will send a summary report in early January.

Lessons Learned: Moving Walkability to Policy and Practice | October 16 | 2018

9am – 10am pacific | 12 noon – 1pm eastern

REGISTER NOW

Utilitarian walkability by 1km buffered postal code – Prepared by Urban Design 4 Health Ltd and Toronto Public Health
The Walkable City: Neighbourhood Design and Preferences, Travel Choices and Health, April 2012 Toronto Public Health


Hear about Dr. Frank’s recent collaborative work in Metro Vancouver, linking detailed data on neighbourhood walkability, regional transit and park access with Type 2 Diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, stress, and sense of community relationships across a range of age and income cohorts, followed by a broader discussion of  walkability research and future directions.

 

Lawrence Frank is Professor in Sustainable Transportation and Public Health at UBC and specializes in the interaction between land use, travel behavior, air quality; and health.  He coined the term “walkability” in the early – mid 90’s; his work led to WalkScore and has been cited over 26,000 times making him one of the 2 most cited planning academics globally. Thompson and Reuters has listed him in the top 1% globally since 2014 as a highly cited researcher.  Dr. Frank has published over 150 peer reviewed articles and reports and co-authored two of the leading books – Heath and Community Design and Urban Sprawl and Public Health which helped to map out the field emerging at the nexus of planning and health.