Urban Green and Built Infrastructure as a Tool to Mitigate Local Air Pollution | April 10 | 2018 | VIDEO AVAILABLE

VIDEO NOW AVAILABLE

For his presentation, Dr. Baldauf will summarize the U.S. EPA’s research program on the use of built and green infrastructure to mitigate local air pollution impacts from transportation facilities.  His presentation will describe the current scientific understanding of how urban infrastructure affects local air quality, including a review of projects conducted in the US and other parts of the world investigating solid noise barrier and roadside vegetation impacts in particular.  He will also summarize existing resources developed by the U.S. EPA to assist environmental and health professionals, urban planners, and developers to identify best practices to mitigate local air pollution impacts and avoid unintended consequences where urban infrastructure may exacerbate local air quality concerns.

 

 

Dr. Baldauf has over 20 years of experience conducting research on emissions, air quality impacts, and adverse health effects from exposures to air pollution emitted by transportation and industrial sources.  His research focuses on the development of policies and practices to mitigate air pollution emissions and impacts at local, urban, and global scales.  His research has led to national emissions standards and best practices to mitigate air pollution impacts using urban development including built and green infrastructure.  He has a joint affiliation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Research & Development and the Office of Transportation & Air Quality where he has led cross-disciplinary research teams focusing on air quality measurements, air dispersion modeling, and sustainable transportation and urban development issues.  He also maintains Adjunct Professor appointments in the School of Engineering at North Carolina State University and Texas A&M University.  Dr. Baldauf co-manages the U.S. EPA’s Mobile Source Emissions Research Laboratory and led the cross-agency Sustainable Transportation Initiative.  He has published over 100 peer-review journal articles and several book chapters on these topics during his career at the U.S. EPA.

CANUE – OEH Seminar | March 9 | 2018

The Canadian Urban Environmental Health Research Consortium: A protocol for building a national environmental exposure data platform for integrated analyses of urban form and health

Occupational and Environmental Health Seminar

Title: The Canadian Urban Environmental Health Research Consortium: A protocol for building a national environmental exposure data platform for integrated analyses of urban form and health

Multiple external environmental exposures related to residential location and urban form have been linked to both positive and negative health impacts.  The Canadian Urban Environmental Health Research Consortium (CANUE) is facilitating the linkage of geospatial exposure data to existing Canadian cohorts and administrative health data holdings ultimately to spark investigations into the interdependent associations of built environment features and health.  CANUE’s focus is on quantifiable exposures that vary spatially on the urban and suburban scale and can be modified through changes in policy or individual behaviour to benefit health.  This includes six areas: air quality, noise, greenness, weather/climate, and transportation and neighbourhood factors. Neighbourhood factors would include: walkability, food environment and socioeconomic characteristics.

Presenter: Dr. Jeff Brook

Dr. Jeff Brook is a professor in the Dalla Lana School of Public Health and Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Toronto.  He is also a senior research scientist with Environment and Climate Change Canada where he has been studying air pollution exposure and health issues for over 25 years.  Dr. Brook is the scientific director of the recently established Canadian Urban Environmental Health Research Consortium, focusing on urban form and health.  He also co-leads a Canadian Network of Centres of Excellence (AllerGen) program on Genes and Environment and leads the environmental exposure component of a national birth cohort, the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) study, examining the influences of environmental factors on children’s health.

The Occupational and Environmental Health Seminar Series is a self-approved group learning activity (Section 1) as defined by the Maintenance of Certification program of The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. The series is also approved by Council of Professional Experience for professional development hours (PDHs) for members of the Canadian Institute of Public Health Inspectors (CIPHI), and by the Canadian Registration Board of Occupational Hygienists (CRBOH) for Registration Maintenance (RM) points. For more information, please contact Elaina MacIntyre (elaina.macintyre@oahpp.ca).

DISCLAIMER: The opinions expressed by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies or views of Public Health Ontario, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by Public Health Ontario.

Measuring Walkability and Urban Sprawl – Opportunities and Challenges | February 28 | 2018 | VIDEO AVAILABLE

February 28 | 2018

9am – 10am pacific | 12 noon – 1pm eastern

 

VIDEO AVAILABLE

 

The rise of physical inactivity and associated chronic health conditions (e.g., diabetes, cardiovascular disease) are a national challenge for Canada, both in terms of costs to healthcare systems and human suffering. This burden has prompted interest improving the active living friendliness (e.g., walkability) of Canadian communities to support daily physical activity as a population-level health intervention.

While many datasets and studies offer local perspectives on the human, health and economic impact of active living environments, national-level data is sparse. This webinar will discuss the potential of national indices recently developed by CANUE members as well as challenges for their use to study associations with health outcomes.

 

 

Dr. Dan Fuller and Dr. Henry Luan

Drs. Fuller and Luan will discuss the highlights from the November 2017 Walkability Workshop and provide an update on directions and research plans for the CANUE Neighbourhood Factors team in 2018.  They will provide an update of the upcoming Canadian urban sprawl and urban density measures being developed for CANUE. The presentation will focus on the development process and challenges with creating urban sprawl and density metrics.

Dr. Nancy Ross and Thomas Hermann

Introducing Can-ALE – the new Canadian Active Living Environment Index. Can-ALE is a recently released dataset of geographic-based active living friendliness measures for Canada. Hear about the work undertaken to produce the dataset, findings that may inform future data creation activities, and potential uses for research and policy.

 

Daniel Fuller is Canada Research Chair in Population Physical Activity in the School of Human Kinetics and Recreation at Memorial University. His research is focused on using wearable technologies to study physical activity, transportation interventions, and equity in urban spaces. He focuses his methodological work on methods for natural experiments, and machine learning.

 

 

Hui (Henry) Luan is a post-doctoral fellow in the School of Human Kinetics and Recreation at Memorial University. His research focuses on spatial and spatio-temporal modeling of health-related phenomena using Bayesian approaches. The main aim is to detect spatial and spatio-temporal clusters of these phenomena and identify risk factors that contribute to the geographical disparities.

 

 

Nancy Ross is a Professor in the Department of Geography, associate member of the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, the Institute for Health and Social Policy, and the School of Environment, Associate Vice-Principal of Research and Innovation at McGill University and is a Canada Research Chair.  Her research interests include how social and built environments affect human health. She currently oversees a broad range of research, including studies which analyze the relationship between neighbourhood-level built design, food environments and health outcomes.

 

Thomas Herrmann is a research assistant and recent graduate of McGill University (BA Geography). Over the past year, Thomas was involved with the creation of Can-ALE, a national database of GIS-derived measures of the active living friendliness of Canadian communities. Presently, his work centres on analyzing the relationship between characteristics of the built environment and population health through data linkage with national health surveys.

In-FLAME 7th Annual Workshop | Apr. 4 – 6th| 2018| Canmore Alberta

At this critical time in human history, low grade inflammation and immune dysfunction are both a non-communicable disease (NCD) reality and a metaphor for broken systems. In this new era, it is becoming increasingly important to integrate seemingly disconnected areas of research. This is the ongoing mandate of inFLAME.

The 2018 program promises to be the most exciting yet, with new speakers who bring expertise to many exciting, diverse and intersecting topics.

Please REGISTER soon so we can finalize venue bookings and catering! You can also find all the accommodation options on our website!

This is one of the most beautiful places imaginable to talk about the importance of healthy environments for human health and resilience. Our rich program so far includes:

  • Urban landscapes, mobility and environmental impacts on child health
  • Early immune phenotypes: disease and microbial signature associations
  • Epigenetic sign posts for predicting and preventing disease
  • Dynamics of the microbiome and metabolome in early life
  • Restoring sustainability, health and mutualism in the Anthropocene
  • Projected effects of climate change on food, water and human health
  • Influence of indoor and outdoor environmental microbiomes
  • Personalised data clouds for understanding wellness and predicting disease
  • Microbiota, immunoregulation, and mental health: implications for public health
  • Impact of ultra-processed foods in western and Indigenous populations
  • Maternal obesity, microbiome and offspring effects.
  • Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and the food allergy epidemic
  • Nature relatedness and novel pathways to reduce stress and inflammation
  • Nutritional interventions and probiotics forthe gut-brain-immune axis
  • The anti-inflammatory effects of positive emotions for health and resilience
  • Optimism interventions for improved outcomes in children
  • Mindfulness and inflammatory markers
  • Antimicrobial resistance, food safety and animal health
  • Solastalgia: understanding the stress and distress caused by environmental degradation
  • Early life stress, noise, sleep disruption and immune disease

……and much, much more!!

Thanks to all who have submitted abstracts so far. Travel awards have closed but general abstracts are open until January 30th 2018.

Wishing you all the best for the Festive Season!

See you in the Canadian Rockies!

Susan Prescott

Anita Kozyrskyj

Dianne Campbell

 

Noise Exposure and Cardiovascular Disease Onset | January 10 | 2018 | VIDEO AVAILABLE

January 10|2018

9am – 10am pacific |12 noon – 1pm eastern

VIDEO AVAILABLE

 

Environmental noise has been linked to a number of health effects including annoyance, sleep disturbance and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). In this seminar, we will present the current evidence on the association between environmental noise and onset of CVD. We will also present preliminary assessments of associations between noise and CVD in Quebec. These assessments are based on population cohorts created with linked medico-administrative health data and recent noise models. We will also present gaps that remain on the relationship between environmental noise and the onset of CVD.


Audrey Smargiassi is an Associate Professor at the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at the School of Public Health and a researcher at the Public Health Research Institute at the University of Montreal.


Larisa Ines Yankoty is a PhD Candidate in Public Health, Epidemiology at the School of Public Health at the University of Montreal.

Walkability Experts Workshop | November 16-17 | 2017

(Photo credit: Project for Public Spaces)

Dr. Dan Fuller (Neighbourhood Factors Team Co-leader) at Memorial University | St. John’s Newfoundland is hosting this Expert Workshop to:

  • discuss the future of walkability measure,
  • work on conceptual definitions of walkability,
  • identify new and emerging methods for measuring walkability, and
  • chart the way forward for CANUE as we implement the next wave of walkability metrics.

Linking Air Quality, Climate and Environmental Inequity | November 21 | 2017 | VIDEO AVAILABLE

November 21 | 2017
9am – 10am pacific | 12 noon – 1pm eastern

VIDEO AVAILABLE

Main drivers of air pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, and urban environmental inequities often overlap, yet rarely do our efforts to address these problems are carried out in an integrated manner.

The growing political will to reduce greenhouse gas emissions around the world is likely to bring significant investments into mitigation policies, including in urban areas. In this policy context, without rigorous coordination between policies that target climate, air pollution, and environmental justice, cities can miss on a unique opportunity to harvest ancillary public health and societal benefits from their climate investments.

In this talk we explore methods that rely on air quality models and mathematical analyses to quantify the impact of individual pollution sources on various policy endpoints such as health or environmental justice.

We provide examples of decision metrics that link various endpoints to sources of air pollution, and explore ways to leverage the wide range of expertise within CANUE to incorporate such quantitative analyses into an integrated assessment platform.

 

Amir Hakami is an Associate Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Carleton University. His expertise is in air quality modeling and use of mathematical methods within these models to address problems that lie at the interface of policy, health, and economics of air pollution.

 

 

 

Robyn Chatwin-Davies is a Master’s student at Carleton University studying atmospheric modelling and air quality. Specifically, her research focuses on environmental justice, as she seeks to understand the relationship between pollution and socio-economic status. Robyn previously completed a Bachelor in Environmental Engineering, graduating with High Distinction in 2012.

 

 

 

Angele Genereux is currently completing her Master’s degree in Environmental Engineering at Carleton, after completing a Bachelor of Engineering degree at the same department in 2016. Her work focuses on estimating the health damage from vehicular emissions on an age-segregated basis, and on ways that these emissions affect environmental health in densely populated urban areas.

Does Living in Greener Areas and Near Water Affect Mortality? | October 10 | 2017 | VIDEO AVAILABLE

 

October 10, 2017

9am – 10am pacific | 12 noon – 1pm eastern

Hear the latest results based on an analysis of the Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohort, from Dr. Dan Crouse and Adele Balram, University of New Brunswick.

 

Dan L Crouse is a Research Associate in the Department of Sociology at UNB. He is trained in both epidemiology and geography, and has led and been involved in many studies examining the impacts of exposure to air pollution on adverse health outcomes, including risk of mortality, adverse birth outcomes, and incidence of cancer. He lead the first Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohort (CanCHEC) study to examine associations between mortality and long-term exposures to fine particulate matter, which was published in 2012, and has published several other studies with CanCHEC since then.

Adele Balram is a Database Analyst with the New Brunswick Institute for Research, Data, and Training. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from the University of New Brunswick and a Master of Public Health from Memorial University in Newfoundland. Adele has several years’ experience in public health, including working as an epidemiologist on environmental and community health issues across New Brunswick.

Both Dr. Crouse and Ms. Balram are supported by the Maritime SPOR Support Unit (MSSU), which receives financial support from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Nova Scotia Department of Health and Wellness, the New Brunswick Department of Health, the Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation (NSHRF), and the New Brunswick Health Research Foundation (NBHRF).

Lead author and CANUE Director Dan Crouse talks about his recent paper on Radio Canada. http://www.rcinet.ca/en/2017/10/13/new-canadian-study-suggests-that-trees-can-play-a-part-in-a-longer-life/

Navigating the Data Merge | September 20 | 26 | 28 |2017 | PRESENTATION NOW AVAILABLE

9am – 10:30am pacific | 12 noon – 1:30pm eastern

DOWNLOAD THE ANNOTATED PRESENTATION SLIDES

Do you manage a cohort, health survey, or administrative health database? Please join us for an overview of our upcoming urban environmental exposure data release, and a discussion of logistics for receiving and merging our data with yours.

We will be giving the same overview on September 20th, 26th and 28th to accommodate as many of you as possible. Just choose the most convenient date!

Read the recently completed CANUE Health Data Holder Survey, identifying opportunities and issues for data merging.

AGENDA

Introduction of CANUE team

Overview of data sets
themes (air pollution, greenness,etc.)
format
documentation
conditions for use

Data delivery and merging
planned delivery dates
push and pull model
ad hoc requests

CANUE tool development
unique exposure combinations tool
temporal aggregation tool
spatial aggregation tool

Q/A and discussion

New Opportunities for Weather and Health Research | September 21 | 2017 | VIDEOS NOW AVAILABLE

VIDEOS NOW AVAILABLE

Environment Canada is currently working on the 2.5 km High Resolution Deterministic Prediction system (HRDPS), expected to become operational next year.

This webinar-style meeting will highlight some of the health databases that CANUE researchers typically use, and provide an overview of these new weather/climate datasets. The overall objective of the meeting is to explore the utility of HRDPS data sets for conducting health research, and identify which health databases might be of most interest, as a first step in working together to advance our research agendas.

AGENDA

Presentation: CANUE

Overview of cohorts/health databases and opportunities for weather/climate research

Presentation: Environment Canada

HRDPS model/outputs, reanalysis opportunities

Discussion

Priorities for data development/linkage