March 26| 2018

The Association between Lifelong Greenspace Exposure and 3-Dimensional Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Barcelona Schoolchildren

Payam Dadvand, Jesus Pujol, Dídac Macià, Gerard Martínez-Vilavella, Laura Blanco-Hinojo, Marion Mortamais, Mar Alvarez-Pedrerol, Raquel Fenoll, Mikel Esnaola, Albert Dalmau-Bueno, Mónica López-Vicente, Xavier Basagaña, Michael Jerrett, Mark J. Nieuwenhuijsen, and Jordi Sunyer

Environ Health Perspect; February 2018, Volume 126, Issue 2 https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1876

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:

Proponents of the biophilia hypothesis believe that contact with nature, including green spaces, has a crucial role in brain development in children. Currently, however, we are not aware of evidence linking such exposure with potential effects on brain structure.

OBJECTIVE:

We determined whether lifelong exposure to residential surrounding greenness is associated with regional differences in brain volume based on 3-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D MRI) among children attending primary school.

METHODS:

We performed a series of analyses using data from a subcohort of 253 Barcelona schoolchildren from the Brain Development and Air Pollution Ultrafine Particles in School Children (BREATHE) project. We averaged satellite-based normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) across 100-m buffers around all residential addresses since birth to estimate each participant’s lifelong exposure to residential surrounding greenness, and we used high-resolution 3D MRIs of brain anatomy to identify regional differences in voxel-wise brain volume associated with greenness exposure. In addition, we performed a supporting substudy to identify regional differences in brain volume associated with measures of working memory (d′ from computerized n-back tests) and inattentiveness (hit reaction time standard error from the Attentional Network Task instrument) that were repeated four times over one year. We also performed a second supporting substudy to determine whether peak voxel tissue volumes in brain regions associated with residential greenness predicted cognitive function test scores.

RESULTS:

Lifelong exposure to greenness was positively associated with gray matter volume in the left and right prefrontal cortex and in the left premotor cortex and with white matter volume in the right prefrontal region, in the left premotor region, and in both cerebellar hemispheres. Some of these regions partly overlapped with regions associated with cognitive test scores (prefrontal cortex and cerebellar and premotor white matter), and peak volumes in these regions predicted better working memory and reduced inattentiveness.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings from a study population of urban schoolchildren in Barcelona require confirmation, but they suggest that being raised in greener neighborhoods may have beneficial effects on brain development and cognitive function.

March 19 | 2018

Associations Between the Built Environment and Objective Measures of Sleep: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

Johnson DA, Hirsch JA, Moore KA, Redline S, Diez Roux AV.

Am J Epidemiol. 2018 Mar 14. doi: 10.1093/aje/kwx302. [Epub ahead of print] https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwx302

Abstract

Although dense neighborhood built environments support increased physical activity and lower obesity, these features may also disturb sleep. Therefore, we sought to understand the association between the built environment and objectively measured sleep. From 2010 to 2013, we analyzed data from examination 5 of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, a diverse population from 6 US cities. We fit multilevel models that assessed the association between the built environment (Street Smart Walk Score, social engagement destinations, street intersections, and population density) and sleep duration or efficiency from 1-week wrist actigraphy in 1,889 individuals. After adjustment for covariates, a 1-standard-deviation increase in Street Smart Walk Score was associated with 23% higher odds of short sleep duration (≤6 hours; odds ratio = 1.2, 95% confidence interval: 1.0, 1.4), as well as shorter average sleep duration (mean difference = -8.1 minutes, 95% confidence interval: -12.1, -4.2). Results were consistent across other built environment measures. Associations were attenuated after adjustment for survey-based measure of neighborhood noise. Dense neighborhood development may have multiple health consequence. In promoting denser neighborhoods to increase walkability, it is important to also implement strategies that reduce the adverse impacts of this development on sleep, such as noise reductions efforts.

March 12 | 2018

Gene-by-environment interactions in urban populations modulate risk phenotypes

Marie-Julie Favé, Fabien C. Lamaze, David Soave, Alan Hodgkinson, Héloïse Gauvin, Vanessa Bruat, Jean-Christophe Grenier, Elias Gbeha, Kimberly Skead, Audrey Smargiassi, Markey Johnson, Youssef Idaghdour & Philip Awadalla

Nature Communications volume 9, Article number: 827 (2018)  https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-03202-2

 

ABSTRACT

Uncovering the interaction between genomes and the environment is a principal challenge of modern genomics and preventive medicine. While theoretical models are well defined, little is known of the G × E interactions in humans. We used an integrative approach to comprehensively assess the interactions between 1.6 million data points, encompassing a range of environmental exposures, health, and gene expression levels, coupled with whole-genome genetic variation. From ∼1000 individuals of a founder population in Quebec, we reveal a substantial impact of the environment on the transcriptome and clinical endophenotypes, overpowering that of genetic ancestry. Air pollution impacts gene expression and pathways affecting cardio-metabolic and respiratory traits, when controlling for genetic ancestry. Finally, we capture four expression quantitative trait loci that interact with the environment (air pollution). Our findings demonstrate how the local environment directly affects disease risk phenotypes and that genetic variation, including less common variants, can modulate individual’s response to environmental challenges.

Urban Green and Built Infrastructure as a Tool to Mitigate Local Air Pollution | April 10 | 2018 | VIDEO AVAILABLE

VIDEO NOW AVAILABLE

For his presentation, Dr. Baldauf will summarize the U.S. EPA’s research program on the use of built and green infrastructure to mitigate local air pollution impacts from transportation facilities.  His presentation will describe the current scientific understanding of how urban infrastructure affects local air quality, including a review of projects conducted in the US and other parts of the world investigating solid noise barrier and roadside vegetation impacts in particular.  He will also summarize existing resources developed by the U.S. EPA to assist environmental and health professionals, urban planners, and developers to identify best practices to mitigate local air pollution impacts and avoid unintended consequences where urban infrastructure may exacerbate local air quality concerns.

 

 

Dr. Baldauf has over 20 years of experience conducting research on emissions, air quality impacts, and adverse health effects from exposures to air pollution emitted by transportation and industrial sources.  His research focuses on the development of policies and practices to mitigate air pollution emissions and impacts at local, urban, and global scales.  His research has led to national emissions standards and best practices to mitigate air pollution impacts using urban development including built and green infrastructure.  He has a joint affiliation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Research & Development and the Office of Transportation & Air Quality where he has led cross-disciplinary research teams focusing on air quality measurements, air dispersion modeling, and sustainable transportation and urban development issues.  He also maintains Adjunct Professor appointments in the School of Engineering at North Carolina State University and Texas A&M University.  Dr. Baldauf co-manages the U.S. EPA’s Mobile Source Emissions Research Laboratory and led the cross-agency Sustainable Transportation Initiative.  He has published over 100 peer-review journal articles and several book chapters on these topics during his career at the U.S. EPA.

March 5 | 2018

Assessing the Exposome with External Measures: Commentary on the State of the Science and Research Recommendations

Michelle C. Turner, Mark Nieuwenhuijsen, Kim Anderson, David Balshaw, Yuxia Cui, Genevieve Dunton, Jane A. Hoppin, Petros Koutrakis, and Michael Jerrett

Annual Review of Public Health Vol. 38:215-239 (Volume publication date March 2017) https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-publhealth-082516-012802

Abstract

The exposome comprises all environmental exposures that a person experiences from conception throughout the life course. Here we review the state of the science for assessing external exposures within the exposome. This article reviews (a) categories of exposures that can be assessed externally, (b) the current state of the science in external exposure assessment, (c) current tools available for external exposure assessment, and (d) priority research needs. We describe major scientific and technological advances that inform external assessment of the exposome, including geographic information systems; remote sensing; global positioning system and geolocation technologies; portable and personal sensing, including smartphone-based sensors and assessments; and self-reported questionnaire assessments, which increasingly rely on Internet-based platforms. We also discuss priority research needs related to methodological and technological improvement, data analysis and interpretation, data sharing, and other practical considerations, including improved assessment of exposure variability as well as exposure in multiple, critical life stages.

CANUE – OEH Seminar | March 9 | 2018

The Canadian Urban Environmental Health Research Consortium: A protocol for building a national environmental exposure data platform for integrated analyses of urban form and health

Occupational and Environmental Health Seminar

Title: The Canadian Urban Environmental Health Research Consortium: A protocol for building a national environmental exposure data platform for integrated analyses of urban form and health

Multiple external environmental exposures related to residential location and urban form have been linked to both positive and negative health impacts.  The Canadian Urban Environmental Health Research Consortium (CANUE) is facilitating the linkage of geospatial exposure data to existing Canadian cohorts and administrative health data holdings ultimately to spark investigations into the interdependent associations of built environment features and health.  CANUE’s focus is on quantifiable exposures that vary spatially on the urban and suburban scale and can be modified through changes in policy or individual behaviour to benefit health.  This includes six areas: air quality, noise, greenness, weather/climate, and transportation and neighbourhood factors. Neighbourhood factors would include: walkability, food environment and socioeconomic characteristics.

Presenter: Dr. Jeff Brook

Dr. Jeff Brook is a professor in the Dalla Lana School of Public Health and Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Toronto.  He is also a senior research scientist with Environment and Climate Change Canada where he has been studying air pollution exposure and health issues for over 25 years.  Dr. Brook is the scientific director of the recently established Canadian Urban Environmental Health Research Consortium, focusing on urban form and health.  He also co-leads a Canadian Network of Centres of Excellence (AllerGen) program on Genes and Environment and leads the environmental exposure component of a national birth cohort, the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) study, examining the influences of environmental factors on children’s health.

The Occupational and Environmental Health Seminar Series is a self-approved group learning activity (Section 1) as defined by the Maintenance of Certification program of The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. The series is also approved by Council of Professional Experience for professional development hours (PDHs) for members of the Canadian Institute of Public Health Inspectors (CIPHI), and by the Canadian Registration Board of Occupational Hygienists (CRBOH) for Registration Maintenance (RM) points. For more information, please contact Elaina MacIntyre (elaina.macintyre@oahpp.ca).

DISCLAIMER: The opinions expressed by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies or views of Public Health Ontario, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by Public Health Ontario.

February 27 | 2018

Six research priorities for cities and climate change

Xuemei Bai, Richard J. Dawson, Diana Ürge-Vorsatz, Gian C. Delgado, Aliyu Salisu Barau, Shobhakar Dhakal, David Dodman, Lykke Leonardsen, Valerie Masson-Delmotte, Debra Roberts, Seth Schultz.

Nature 555, 23-25 (2018) doi: 10.1038/d41586-018-02409-z www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-02409-z

Xuemei Bai and colleagues call for long-term, cross-disciplinary studies to reduce carbon emissions and urban risks from global warming.